Wednesday, August 29, 2012

They Don't Care About Us

Happy birthday MJ



When he died, I ended up at the Sony memorial night and the tv crew decided to interview me. I answered with this song when I was asked what was my favourite song of his.

"They Don't Care About Us"

Skin head, dead head
Everybody gone bad
Situation, aggravation
Everybody allegation
In the suite, on the news
Everybody dog food
Bang bang, shot dead
Everybody's gone mad

All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us

Beat me, hate me
You can never break me
Will me, thrill me
You can never kill me
Jew me, sue me
Everybody do me
Kick me, kike me
Don't you black or white me

All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us

Tell me what has become of my life
I have a wife and two children who love me
I am the victim of police brutality, now
I'm tired of bein' the victim of hate
You're rapin' me off my pride
Oh, for God's sake
I look to heaven to fulfill its prophecy...
Set me free

Skin head, dead head
Everybody gone bad
Trepidation, speculation
Everybody allegation
In the suite, on the news
Everybody dog food
Black male, black mail
Throw your brother in jail

All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us

Tell me what has become of my rights
Am I invisible because you ignore me?
Your proclamation promised me free liberty, now
I'm tired of bein' the victim of shame
They're throwing me in a class with a bad name
I can't believe this is the land from which I came
You know I really do hate to say it
The government don't wanna see
But if Roosevelt was livin'
He wouldn't let this be, no, no

Skin head, dead head
Everybody gone bad
Situation, speculation
Everybody litigation
Beat me, bash me
You can never trash me
Hit me, kick me
You can never get me

All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us

Some things in life they just don't wanna see
But if Martin Luther was livin'
He wouldn't let this be, no, no

Skin head, dead head
Everybody gone bad
Situation, segregation
Everybody allegation
In the suite, on the news
Everybody dog food
Kick me, strike me
Don't you wrong or right me

All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us

All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about
All I wanna say is that
they don't really care about
All I wanna say is that
They don't really care about us



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Tuesday, August 14, 2012

STOP 114 A


Section 114A deals with allegedly illicit or harmful content on the Internet. In short, the amendment enables law enforcement officials to swiftly hold someone accountable for publishing seditious, defamatory, or libelous content online.

Visit Stop 114A to find out more


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Saturday, August 11, 2012

I understand

i understand

For long as I can remember, these words have been a part of my life. I grew up reading it as it hanged in the living room of my home. Every day of my life I saw these words hung in a faded yellow and black framed poster. These words inspired me for all my life but I never knew who wrote them. To me it was and still remains the most significant words that have shaped my life.

When I was 17 we moved to our current home and while moving my mom chucked the frame and another poster away in the trash. I remember frantically looking for it to be packed when she told me what she had done. You see the poster belonged to my father and my mother wanted nothing that wasn’t Indian to hang in our new home. I actually ran out to the trash and dug the poster out and from then onwards the poster has hung just above my work desk. Its faded and torn in a few places but I’m sure it can last a few more decades or even a century since its at least older than me. Every now and then I’d look up to read those words … I understand.  

These words inspired me for all my life but I never knew who wrote them. I have this book of poems containing nearly every single classic poem and I’ve gone through it a few times looking for the author but I never knew whose words it was. Neither Shakespeare nor Wordsworth could lay claim to those inspiring words. When I first started using the internet, I tried searching up the writer but I could never find him. Yes I always knew it was a him. Don’t ask me why but I just knew it was a him.  So every few years I’d search the words to find out who wrote the poem.

Today I finally found out who it was.

I understand was wrote by Walter Rinder and I think was a part of a series of posters he had penned in the 70s. The most amazing thing I found out about him was is he was a photographer and he opened San Francisco's first all-color photography gallery.

I have tried to live my life by these words as much as possible. These were the words that taught me that only if I loved myself would I be able to love others. It taught me to be open, honest and truthful always. I learned to reach out to people, share and the value of freedom thanks to these words. So thank you Walter Rinder. I have been wanting to thank you for so many years.

Thank you for being such an inspiring guide. Your words are my most prized treasure.

About Walter Rinder
(though theres a link I’m posting it here so that I never lose this info as it took me some time to find it)

Walter Rinder was born on June 3, 1934, in Chicago, Illinois. He was born as a Gemini. His father was Jewish who was born in New York City; his mother was an English-Dutch Protestant who was born in rural Illinois.

From 1948 to 1952 he attended Alhambra high school where he studied several art courses, was active in public speaking, and joined the debate team.

From 1952 to 1954 he attended Mt. San Antonio Junior College in Pomona. From 1955 to 1957 he was in the U.S. Army. In 1959 he began his adventures by leaving his home area and traveled by train to Phoenix, Arizona, with $35 and a suitcase in hand. "I want more out of life than most people", he wrote.

From 1960 to 1961 he traveled through San Francisco, Los Angeles, Oklahoma City, Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Tulsa, and Albuquerque. In 1965 he had his first public showing of his photography in San Francisco at the Bernal Heights Street Fair. This was his first public announcement of his photos in San Francisco. In 1968 he opened an all-color photo gallery in San Francisco; it was San Francisco's first all-color photography gallery. 

Early in 1969 he signed a contract with Celestial Arts Publishing Company in California. Later that year he wrote his first book, which became Celestial's first published book. Becoming restless and anxious for expansion, Walter left San Francisco in late 1969 and moved to Laytonville, California, a little town of 850 people on Highway 101 about 120 miles north of San Francisco. He lived there for one year. He wanted to experience the adventures of living in a small town atmosphere. There he had a small gallery located in his home. 

He! remembers the inspiring redwoods, which helped him to contact his real nature, writing about his feelings, and the local people who were beautifully simple by nature compared to the people he met in his eight years in San Francisco. In 1969 his first black and white posters and greeting cards were published by Celestial Arts.

From 1970 through 1979 Walter traveled extensively throughout the U.S., covering the entire country on several trips. In 1970 he had moved to Portland, Oregon, and had his first book published, entitled Love is an Attitude. Also, in 1970 he opened his gallery, "This Speck of Earth", in the city of Portland, Oregon. Here he helped kids with their drug problems and often was invited to speak to schools and local clubs. The gallery became a sanctuary for people who needed caring and some kindness and genuine interest in them. 

In 1971 he published This Time Called Life. In 1973 his first record album was produced entitled "Love is an Attitude". Also, in that year Spectrum of Love, The Humanness of You, and Follow Your Heart were published. In 1974 he held his first East Coast showing of color photos in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1975 Love is My Reason and Will You Share With Me? were published. Where Will I be Tomorrow? was published in 1976. 

In 1977 Walter started a one-year journey through the U.S. meeting new people and sharing love. In 1978 Friends and Lovers and Aura of Love were published. In 1979 Follow Your Heart was published as a photographic edition of his poem. A Promise of Change was published in 1979 as a hard-back edition.Forever Us was published in 1981.

In the late 1980's, Walter went back to California and took care of his aging mom. Then he and his mom returned to Oregon, where he continued to take care of her until she passed away in 1992. In Oregon, Walter sold antiques and collectibles (which he continues to do).

In 1990 The World I Used to Know was published as a selected collection of his works.
Spectrum of Love Revisited was published in 2001, the first book since 1990. Walter now continues to write and expects to publish at least one book per year through Discovery Gallery 2000, Inc. He plans to continue traveling in the U.S., meeting strangers along the way who will become new friends.


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